Robotics Book: Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics

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Book title: Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics

Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics Technical details/features and description:

* Teaches the concepts of behavior-based programming through text, programming examples, and a unique online simulator robot

* Explains how to design new behaviors by manipulating old ones and adjusting programming

* Does not assume reader familiarity with robotics or programming languages

* Includes a section on designing your own behavior-based system from scratch (20040601)

List Price: $ 29.95

Price: [wpramaprice asin=”0071427783″]

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3 thoughts on “Robotics Book: Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics

  1. 30 of 31 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Accessible guide to behavior-based robotics, March 10, 2006
    By 
    calvinnme
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics (Paperback)

    Behavior-based robotics is quite simply the design of robots where there are no internal “models” of the environment. Instead, the robot’s action is state-machine driven via inputs gleaned from the robot’s sensors. This book gives very practical advice on building and programming such a robot. Some mathematics is involved, so the reader who knows trigonometry, algebra, and the basics of computer programming would be best prepared to make good use of this book.
    Chapter 1 uses the author’s Java-based simulator, BSim, to observe the behavior of a working simulated robot. This chapter tries to answer the big picture questions : What exactly is a robot and what are its essential components?
    Chapter 2 reviews the concept of the feedback control system in a very accessible fashion. The author uses examples from BSim to demonstrate how good control systems can go bad.
    Chapter 3 shows how to build primitive behaviors, introduces the concept of triggers, and discusses ballistic versus servo behaviors.
    Chapter 4 deals with arbiters, which is the software construct that all behavior-based systems must have to manage conflict between behaviors.
    Chapter 5 begins instruction on writing complete behavior-based programs using everything learned up to this point. Included are techniques for homing, avoidance, and wall-following.
    Chapter 6 discusses the task of decomposing a problem into the design of a robot. This chapter specifically discusses the design of “SodaBot”, a robot which moves empty soda cans to recycling bins.
    Chapter 7 takes a software-centered look at various common sensors, how they function, and the ways that sensor output can be misleading.
    Chapter 8 rounds out the book with a case study of a behavior-based robot implementation. The example is a simple one, but it incorporates all software elements needed by any behavior-based robot. The author uses his own “RoCK”, which is short for “Robot Conversion Kit”, which is a self-contained electronics and sensor package based on Atmel’s AVR AT90S8535 microcontroller. The author does an excellent job of discussing the code that must be written to make the robot perform as described.
    Chapter 9 is the author’s speculation on the features and forms of future robots.
    The appendices have useful information on the mathematics of differential drive, the author’s simulator “BSim”, and some frequently used functions and their pseudocode. Each chapter contains exercises that are design-oriented and therefore have open-ended solutions. Thus there are no solutions given in the book or at its website.
    Although this book does an excellent job of covering all of the aspects of programming a behavior-based robot, the reader might benefit from the other major text on the subject, “Behavior-Based Robotics (Intelligent Robotics and Autonomous Agents)” by Ronald Arkin. That book is much more academic and less practical than this one, and it is also rather expensive. Thus, it might be best if you can get it used or from a library. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in behavior-based robots and in the practical details of creating and programming them.

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  2. 19 of 19 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Practical Guide Indeed, January 19, 2004
    By 
    Randy M. Dumse (Winnsboro, TX United States) –

    This review is from: Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics (Paperback)

    You can really see that Jones knows what he is talking about reading this book, and you can see the influence participation in making a practical robot (Roomba) for mass production has had on Jones thinking. Previously Jones authored _Mobile Robots_ with Anita Flynn, a product of MIT research. Now Jones brings many practical and useful explanations in very easily understood terms to the beginner, and hidden depth to the experienced robot programmer. While many of the research level books talk “about” Behavior-Based Programming in general terms, Jones descends into specifics, such as the inner workings of arbitration, and some of the different schemes used, and the difference between ballistic and servo behaviors. Well written, an easy read, and deceptively meaty exercises. One of the appendices of the book cover some much-needed common algorithms. Another the mathematics of differential drive. Plus, this book has a companion web site, also covered in a appendix, written by Daniel Roth, where you can get your own free virtual robot to “play” with and control. You can run your own experiments with their pre-canned behaviors, and watch the results of your concept level programming in simulated action. More than a book, this is a learning opportunity for anyone wanting to understand practical robot programming “behavior style”.

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  3. 13 of 13 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent introduction to Behavior-based AI, March 3, 2004
    By 
    STEPHANE GAUTHIER (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) –

    This review is from: Robot Programming : A Practical Guide to Behavior-Based Robotics (Paperback)

    I first read Jones’ previous book (“Mobile Robots: Inspiration to Implementation”) back in 1999 and was very excited to see how simple AI could be.

    This new book goes much deeper in the art of designing behavior-based robots and does a great job at it. And Even though I had already gainged a lot of experience programming my own robots, I still found it very stimulating and learned a thing or two.

    I highly recommend this to any aspiring roboticist, and even the old pros!

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